Archive for the ‘Oddballs and Oddities’ Category

Marine killed in rocket attack in Iraq

March 22, 2016

Marine killed in rocket attack identified; Detachment sent to Iraq

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Marine’s Letters to ISIS

August 8, 2015

A US Marine writes a letter to ISIS, threatens it with grave consequences, also lays it into POTUS Obama and the Congress.

Marine Isis

Semper Fi whatever to you!

Only in America: Police Tase and Beat Psychotic Man

February 2, 2015

A clearly unwell psychotic man was tasered twice and smacked with a police baton about 20 times at a car dealer somewhere in the USA.

Pothead Obama #Obama

November 16, 2014

Pothead Obama


 

Obama Oganja

While likely not the first principal inhabitant of the White House with a heavy drug addiction, Obama is surely the first Pothead US President. He was (and who’s to say that he still isn’t) a heavy (ab)user of pot for many decades and as recently as a decade and a half ago, and as a result probably has an extensive brain damage affecting cognitive functions and analytical abilities, his reasoning generally and also his speech.

 BTW, nice picture of Idi Amin there on Obama’s wall. Very apropos too.

 

Obama West Point Speech in Full with Analysis by Yankophobe

May 29, 2014
“Just because we have the best hammer does not mean that every problem is a nail”: President Obama

Yankophobe — you don’t have the best hammer you just choose the most rusty nail. Always.

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President Barack Obama has delivered a key foreign policy address. Here’s the speech in full – with analysis of key passages by this blog’s author Mr. Yanko Phobe himself.

Good morning. Thank you, General Caslen, for that introduction. To General Trainor, General Clarke, and the faculty and staff at West Point – you have been outstanding stewards of this proud institution, and excellent mentors for the newest officers in the United States Army. I’d like to acknowledge the Army’s leadership – Secretary McHugh and General Odierno, as well as Senator Jack Reed – a proud graduate of West Point himself.

To the class of 2014, I congratulate you on taking your place on the Long Gray Line. Among you is the first all-female command team: Erin Mauldin and Austen Boroff. In Calla Glavin, you have a Rhodes Scholar, and Josh Herbeck proves that West Point accuracy extends beyond the three point line. To the entire class, let me reassure you in these final hours at West Point: as Commander-in-Chief, I hereby absolve all cadets who are on restriction for minor conduct offences. Let me just say that nobody ever did that for me when I was in school.

I know you join me in extending a word of thanks to your families. Joe DeMoss, whose son James is graduating, spoke for many parents when he wrote me a letter about the sacrifices you have made. “Deep inside,” he wrote, “we want to explode with pride at what they are committing to do in the service of our country.” Like several graduates, James is a combat veteran. And I would like to ask all of us here today to stand and pay tribute – not only to the veterans among us, but to the more than 2.5 million Americans who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan, and their families. It is a particularly useful time for America to reflect on those who have sacrificed so much for our freedom – for you are the first class to graduate since 9/11 who may not be sent into combat in Iraq or Afghanistan.

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Yankophobe: Obama thinks he will end America’s long wars other than by victory but the wars may have a different opinion. Also if they are not sent into combat in far flung places, they’ll be fighting on America’s own land. If you don’t come to the enemy, the enemy will come to you.

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When I first spoke at West Point in 2009, we still had more than 100,000 troops in Iraq. We were preparing to surge in Afghanistan. Our counterterrorism efforts were focused on al-Qaeda’s core leadership. And our nation was just beginning a long climb out of the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression.

Four and a half years later, the landscape has changed. We have removed our troops from Iraq. We are winding down our war in Afghanistan. Al-Qaeda’s leadership in the border region between Pakistan and Afghanistan has been decimated, and Osama Bin Laden is no more. Through it all, we have refocused our investments in a key source of American strength: a growing economy that can provide opportunity here at home.

In fact, by most measures, America has rarely been stronger relative to the rest of the world. Those who argue otherwise – who suggest that America is in decline, or has seen its global leadership slip away – are either misreading history or engaged in partisan politics. Think about it. Our military has no peer. The odds of a direct threat against us by any nation are low, and do not come close to the dangers we faced during the Cold War. Meanwhile, our economy remains the most dynamic on Earth; our businesses the most innovative. Each year, we grow more energy independent. From Europe to Asia, we are the hub of alliances unrivalled in the history of nations. America continues to attract striving immigrants. The values of our founding inspire leaders in parliaments and new movements in public squares around the globe. And when a typhoon hits the Philippines, or girls are kidnapped in Nigeria, or masked men occupy a building in Ukraine – it is America that the world looks to for help. The United States is the one indispensable nation. That has been true for the century passed, and will likely be true for the century to come.

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Yankophobe: There are many attacks on Obama’s policy left, right and center. And those who feel that the US isn’t the power it once was are wrong too — the US is a power it has never been. It has always been very picky in choosing its adversaries, sometimes trying to subdue them with crippling sanctions for dozens of years before making an attack as was the case with Iraq but still the campaign did not exactly end in a victory. Not to mention the human cost of that particular genocidal war running into millions of people. 

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But the world is changing with accelerating speed. This presents opportunity, but also new dangers. We know all too well, after 9/11, just how technology and globalisation has put power once reserved for states in the hands of the individual, raising the capacity of terrorists to do harm. Russia’s aggression toward former Soviet states unnerves capitals in Europe, while China’s economic rise and military reach worries its neighbours. From Brazil to India, rising middle classes compete with our own, and governments seek a greater say in global forums. And even as developing nations embrace democracy and market economies, 24-hour news and pervasive social media makes it impossible to ignore sectarian conflicts, failing states and popular uprisings that might have received only passing notice a generation ago. It will be your generation’s task to respond to this new world. The question we face – the question you will face – is not whether America will lead, but how we will lead, not just to secure our peace and prosperity, but also to extend peace and prosperity around the globe.

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Yankophobe: Obama is not abandoning America’s perceived leading role in the world. He is endorsing the view that his country has a special, almost mystical, mission. Well, the Nazis also believed in their mystical mission. Valhalla, Nordic Runes and all that crap. I know where America will be led in to.

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This question isn’t new. At least since George Washington served as Commander-in-Chief, there have been those who warned against foreign entanglements that do not touch directly on our security or economic well-being. Today, according to self-described realists, conflicts in Syria or Ukraine or the Central African Republic are not ours to solve. Not surprisingly, after costly wars and continuing challenges at home, that view is shared by many Americans. A different view, from interventionists on the left and right, says we ignore these conflicts at our own peril; that America’s willingness to apply force around the world is the ultimate safeguard against chaos, and America’s failure to act in the face of Syrian brutality or Russian provocations not only violates our conscience, but invites escalating aggression in the future.

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Each side can point to history to support its claims. But I believe neither view fully speaks to the demands of this moment. It is absolutely true that in the 21st Century, American isolationism is not an option. If nuclear materials are not secure, that could pose a danger in American cities. As the Syrian civil war spills across borders, the capacity of battle-hardened groups to come after us increases. Regional aggression that goes unchecked – in southern Ukraine, the South China Sea, or anywhere else in the world – will ultimately impact our allies, and could draw in our military. Beyond these narrow rationales, I believe we have a real stake – an abiding self-interest – in making sure our children grow up in a world where school-girls are not kidnapped; where individuals aren’t slaughtered because of tribe or faith or political beliefs. I believe that a world of greater freedom and tolerance is not only a moral imperative – it also helps keep us safe.

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Yankophobe: Actually America is doomed (as is any empire or even any country over time). Neither isolationism, nor activism will save America. But the worst is what Obama seems to propose — some kind of middle ground.

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But to say that we have an interest in pursuing peace and freedom beyond our borders is not to say that every problem has a military solution. Since World War Two, some of our most costly mistakes came not from our restraint, but from our willingness to rush into military adventures – without thinking through the consequences; without building international support and legitimacy for our action, or levelling with the American people about the sacrifice required. Tough talk draws headlines, but war rarely conforms to slogans. As General Eisenhower, someone with hard-earned knowledge on this subject, said at this ceremony in 1947: “War is mankind’s most tragic and stupid folly; to seek or advise its deliberate provocation is a black crime against all men.”

Like Eisenhower, this generation of men and women in uniform know all too well the wages of war. That includes those of you at West Point. Four of the service-members who stood in the audience when I announced the surge of our forces in Afghanistan gave their lives in that effort. More were wounded. I believe America’s security demanded those deployments. But I am haunted by those deaths. I am haunted by those wounds. And I would betray my duty to you, and to the country we love, if I sent you into harm’s way simply because I saw a problem somewhere in the world that needed fixing, or because I was worried about critics who think military intervention is the only way for America to avoid looking weak.

Here’s my bottom line – America must always lead on the world stage. If we don’t, no one else will. The military that you have joined is, and always will be, the backbone of that leadership. But US military action cannot be the only – or even primary – component of our leadership in every instance. Just because we have the best hammer does not mean that every problem is a nail.

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Yankophoe: Mr Obama’s paradox is that he is commander-in-chief of the military that he and many call the most powerful military the world has ever known, yet he is afraid to use that very military for its successes have been pretty scarce ever since WW2 – losing or at least “not winning” every major conflict. Consider also that America has never fought the real powerful nations of this world such as China, India, the European Union or even Russia. Ever since ww2 America has been fighting either tiny or medium underdeveloped nations nowhere nearly as “advanced” as she is. 

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And because the costs associated with military action are so high, you should expect every civilian leader – and especially your commander-in-chief – to be clear about how that awesome power should be used.

Let me spend the rest of my time, then, describing my vision for how the United States of America, and our military, should lead in the years to come.

President Obama: ”America should never ask permission to protect our people”

Yankophobe: I think he stole that notion from President Putin of Russia.

First, let me repeat a principle I put forward at the outset of my presidency – the United States will use military force, unilaterally if necessary, when our core interests demand it – when our people are threatened; when our livelihood is at stake; or when the security of our allies is in danger. In these circumstances, we still need to ask tough questions about whether our action is proportional, effective and just. International opinion matters. But America should never ask permission to protect our people, our homeland, or our way of life. On the other hand, when issues of global concern that do not pose a direct threat to the United States are at stake – when crises arise that stir our conscience or push the world in a more dangerous direction – then the threshold for military action must be higher. In such circumstances, we should not go it alone. Instead, we must mobilise allies and partners to take collective action. We must broaden our tools to include diplomacy and development; sanctions and isolation; appeals to international law and – if just, necessary, and effective – multilateral military action. We must do so because collective action in these circumstances is more likely to succeed, more likely to be sustained, and less likely to lead to costly mistakes.

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Yankophobe: Obama’s doctrine has an ominous ring to it — every one knows America’s coarse interests and “allies” (puppets, stooges and brown nosers) are all over the world.

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This leads to my second point – for the foreseeable future, the most direct threat to America at home and abroad remains terrorism. But a strategy that involves invading every country that harbours terrorist networks is naive and unsustainable. I believe we must shift our counterterrorism strategy – drawing on the successes and shortcomings of our experience in Iraq and Afghanistan – to more effectively partner with countries where terrorist networks seek a foothold. This reflects the fact that today’s principal threat no longer comes from a centralised al-Qaeda leadership. Instead, it comes from decentralised al-Qaeda affiliates and extremists, many with agendas focused in the countries where they operate. This lessens the possibility of large-scale 9/11-style attacks against the homeland, but heightens the danger to US personnel overseas, as we saw in Benghazi or less defensible targets, as we saw in a shopping mall in Nairobi. We need a strategy that matches this diffuse threat; one that expands our reach without sending forces that stretch our military thin, or stir up local resentments.

Empowering partners is a large part of what we’ve done in Afghanistan. Together with our allies, America struck huge blows against al-Qaeda core, and pushed back against an insurgency that threatened to overrun the country. But sustaining this progress depends on the ability of Afghans to do the job. That’s why we trained hundreds of thousands of Afghan soldiers and police. Earlier this spring, those forces secured an election in which Afghans voted for the first democratic transfer of power in their history. At the end of this year, a new Afghan president will be in office, and America’s combat mission will be over.

Now, as we move to a train-and-advise mission in Afghanistan, our reduced presence there will allow us to more effectively address emerging threats in the Middle East and North Africa. Earlier this year, I asked my national security team to develop a plan for a network of partnerships from South Asia to the Sahel. Today, as part of this effort, I am calling on Congress to support a new Counter-Terrorism Partnerships Fund of up to $5bn, which will allow us to train, build capacity, and facilitate partner countries on the front lines. These resources will give us flexibility to fulfil different missions, including training security forces in Yemen who have gone on the offensive against al-Qaeda; supporting a multinational force to keep the peace in Somalia; working with European allies to train a functioning security force and border patrol in Libya; and facilitating French operations in Mali.

A critical focus of this effort will be the ongoing crisis in Syria. As frustrating as it is, there are no easy answers – no military solution that can eliminate the terrible suffering any time soon. As president, I made a decision that we should not put American troops into the middle of this increasingly sectarian civil war, and I believe that is the right decision. But that does not mean we shouldn’t help the Syrian people stand up against a dictator who bombs and starves his people. And in helping those who fight for the right of all Syrians to choose their own future, we also push back against the growing number of extremists who find safe haven in the chaos.

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Yankophobe: For those who’ve had enough philosophy, some hard news – just like his dumb predecessors in power Obama chooses to support some terrorists over others but alienating both as a result. Cue: terrorist attacks on America will never end.

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With the additional resources I’m announcing today, we will step up our efforts to support Syria’s neighbours – Jordan and Lebanon; Turkey and Iraq – as they host refugees, and confront terrorists working across Syrian borders. I will work with Congress to ramp up support for those in the Syrian opposition who offer the best alternative to terrorists and a brutal dictator. And we will continue to coordinate with our friends and allies in Europe and the Arab World – to push for a political resolution of this crisis, and make sure that those countries, and not just the United States, are contributing their fair share of support to the Syrian people.

 

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Yankophobe: Yes, a good idea. Just borrow more money from China.

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Let me make one final point about our efforts against terrorism. The partnership I’ve described does not eliminate the need to take direct action when necessary to protect ourselves. When we have actionable intelligence, that’s what we do – through capture operations, like the one that brought a terrorist involved in the plot to bomb our embassies in 1998 to face justice; or drone strikes, like those we have carried out in Yemen and Somalia. But as I said last year, in taking direct action, we must uphold standards that reflect our values. That means taking strikes only when we face a continuing, imminent threat, and only where there is near certainty of no civilian casualties. For our actions should meet a simple test – we must not create more enemies than we take off the battlefield.

I also believe we be more transparent about both the basis for our actions, and the manner in which they are carried out – whether it is drone strikes, or training partners. I will increasingly turn to our military to take the lead and provide information to the public about our efforts. Our intelligence community has done outstanding work and we must continue to protect sources and methods. But, when we cannot explain our efforts clearly and publicly, we face terrorist propaganda and international suspicion; we erode legitimacy with our partners and our people; and we reduce accountability in our own government.

This issue of transparency is directly relevant to a third aspect of American leadership: our efforts to strengthen and enforce international order.

After World War Two, America had the wisdom to shape institutions to keep the peace and support human progress – from Nato and the United Nations, to the World Bank and IMF. Though imperfect, these institutions have been a force multiplier – reducing the need for unilateral American action, and increased restraint among other nations. But just as the world has changed, this architecture must change as well. At the height of the Cold War, President Kennedy spoke about the need for a peace based upon “a gradual evolution in human institutions”. Evolving these institutions to meet the demands of today must be a critical part of American leadership.

Of course, sceptics often downplay the effectiveness of multilateral action. For them, working through international institutions, or respecting international law, is a sign of weakness. I think they’re wrong. Let me offer just two examples why.

In Ukraine, Russia’s recent actions recall the days when Soviet tanks rolled into Eastern Europe. But this isn’t the Cold War. Our ability to shape world opinion helped isolate Russia right away. Because of American leadership, the world immediately condemned Russian actions. Europe and the G-7 joined with us to impose sanctions. Nato reinforced our commitment to Eastern European allies. The IMF is helping to stabilise Ukraine’s economy. OSCE monitors brought the eyes of the world to unstable parts of Ukraine. This mobilisation of world opinion and institutions served as a counterweight to Russian propaganda, Russian troops on the border, and armed militias. This weekend, Ukrainians voted by the millions; yesterday, I spoke to their next president. We don’t know how the situation will play out, and there will be grave challenges. But standing with our allies on behalf of international order has given a chance for the Ukrainian people to choose their future.

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Yankophobe:This is not exactly signalling a huge commitment – Obama made a deal with Putin and all his protestations are for show. The US cannot decouple itself from Russia in many areas, not least the 11 or so GPS tracking stations that the US has on Russian territory.

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Similarly, despite frequent warnings from the United States, Israel, and others, the Iranian nuclear program steadily advanced for years. But at the beginning of my presidency, we built a coalition that imposed sanctions on the Iranian economy, while extending the hand of diplomacy to the Iranian government. Now, we have an opportunity to resolve our differences peacefully. The odds of success are still long, and we reserve all options to prevent Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. But for the first time in a decade, we have a very real chance of achieving a breakthrough agreement – one that is more effective and durable than what would be achieved through the use of force. And throughout these negotiations, it has been our willingness to work through multilateral channels that kept the world on our side.

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Yankophobe: This is a lose / lose.

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This is American leadership. This is American strength. In each case, we built coalitions to respond to a specific challenge. Now we need to do more to strengthen the institutions that can anticipate and prevent them from spreading. For example, Nato is the strongest alliance the world has ever known. But we are now working with Nato allies to meet new missions – within Europe, where our Eastern allies must be reassured; and also beyond Europe’s borders, where our Nato allies must pull their weight to counter-terrorism, respond to failed states, and train a network of partners.

 

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Yankophobe: It sounds like the whole passage is lifted from Hitler’s speeches.

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Likewise, the UN provides a platform to keep the peace in states torn apart by conflict. Now we need to make sure that those nations who provide peace-keepers have the training and equipment to keep the peace, so that we can prevent the type of killing we have seen in Congo and Sudan. We are deepening our investment in countries that support these missions. Because having other nations maintain order in their own neighbourhoods lessens the need for us to put our own troops in harm’s way. It is a smart investment. It’s the right way to lead.

Keep in mind, not all international norms relate directly to armed conflict. In the face of cyber-attacks, we are working to shape and enforce rules of the road to secure our networks and citizens. In the Asia Pacific, we are supporting Southeast Asian nations as they negotiate a code of conduct with China on the South China Sea, and are working to resolve territorial and maritime disputes through international law. That spirit of cooperation must energise the global effort to combat climate change – a creeping national security crisis that will help shape your time in uniform, as we’re called on to respond to refugee flows, natural disasters, and conflicts over water and food. That’s why, next year, I intend to make sure America is out front in a global framework to preserve our planet.

You see, American influence is always stronger when we lead by example. We cannot exempt ourselves from the rules that apply to everyone else. We can’t call on others to make commitments to combat climate change if so many of our political leaders deny that it is taking place. It’s a lot harder to call on China to resolve its maritime disputes under the Law of the Sea Convention when the United States Senate has refused to ratify it – despite the repeated insistence of our top military leaders that the treaty advances our national security. That’s not leadership; that’s retreat. That’s not strength; that’s weakness. And it would be utterly foreign to leaders like Roosevelt and Truman; Eisenhower and Kennedy.

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Yankophobe: This is just rubbish for domestic consumption. Also it’s very funny how he mentions Roosevelt and Truman in the same sentence… the thing is Roosevelt was poisoned by British agents while Truman was a British stooge they put in Roosevelt’s place to ensure a return to a pro-British policy

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I believe in American exceptionalism with every fibre of my being. But what makes us exceptional is not our ability to flout international norms and the rule of law; it’s our willingness to affirm them through our actions. That’s why I will continue to push to close GTMO [Guantanamo Bay detention camp] – because American values and legal traditions don’t permit the indefinite detention of people beyond our borders. That’s why we are putting in place new restrictions on how America collects and uses intelligence – because we will have fewer partners and be less effective if a perception takes hold that we are conducting surveillance against ordinary citizens. America does not simply stand for stability, or the absence of conflict, no matter what the price; we stand for the more lasting peace that can only come through opportunity and freedom for people everywhere.

 

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Yankophobe: American exceptionalism again. Like I said, the Nazis were pretty exceptional too. Americanism (and Obamism) = 21st century’s Nazism.

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Which brings me to the fourth and final element of American leadership – our willingness to act on behalf of human dignity. America’s support for democracy and human rights goes beyond idealism – it’s a matter of national security. Democracies are our closest friends, and are far less likely to go to war. Free and open economies perform better, and become markets for our goods. Respect for human rights is an antidote to instability, and the grievances that fuel violence and terror.

A new century has brought no end to tyranny. In capitals around the globe – including some of America’s partners – there has been a crackdown on civil society. The cancer of corruption has enriched too many governments and their cronies, and enraged citizens from remote villages to iconic squares. Watching these trends, or the violent upheaval in parts of the Arab World, it is easy to be cynical.

But remember that because of America’s efforts – through diplomacy and foreign assistance, as well as the sacrifices of our military – more people live under elected governments today than any time in human history. Technology is empowering civil society in ways that no iron fist can control. New breakthroughs are lifting hundreds of millions out of poverty. And even the upheaval of the Arab World reflects the rejection of an authoritarian order that was anything but stable, and offers the long-term prospect of more responsive and effective governance.

In Egypt, we acknowledge that our relationship is anchored in security interests – from the peace treaty with Israel, to shared efforts against violent extremism. So we have not cut off cooperation with the new government. But we can and will persistently press for the reforms that the Egyptian people have demanded.

Meanwhile, look at a country like Burma, which only a few years ago was an intractable dictatorship, hostile to the United States. Thanks to the enormous courage of the people in that country – and because we took the diplomatic initiative – we have seen political reforms opening a once closed society; a movement away from partnership with North Korea in favour of engagement with America and our allies. We are now supporting reform – and badly needed national reconciliation – through assistance and investment; coaxing and, at times, public criticism. Progress could be reversed. But if Burma succeeds, we will have gained a new partner without having fired a shot.

In all these cases, we should not expect change to happen overnight. That’s why we form alliances – not only with governments, but with ordinary people. For unlike other nations, America is not afraid of individual empowerment, we are strengthened by it – by civil society and transparency; by striving entrepreneurs and small businesses; by educational exchange and opportunity for women and girls. That’s who we are. That’s what we represent.

I saw that throughout my trip to Africa last year. American assistance has made possible the prospect of an Aids-free generation, while helping Africans care for their sick. We are helping farmers get their products to market, and feeding populations once endangered by famine. We aim to double access to electricity in sub-Saharan Africa, so people are connected to the promise of the global economy.

All this creates new partners and shrinks the space for terrorism. Tragically, no American security operation can eradicate the threat posed by an extremist group like Boko Haram. That is why we must focus both on rescuing those girls, but also on supporting Nigerian efforts to educate its youth. Indeed, this should be one of the hard-earned lessons of Iraq and Afghanistan, where our military became the strongest advocate for diplomacy and development. Foreign assistance isn’t an afterthought – something nice to do apart from our national defence. It’s part of what makes us strong.

Ultimately, global leadership requires us to see the world as it is, with all its danger and uncertainty. But American leadership also requires us to see the world as it should be – a place where the aspirations of individual human beings matter; where hopes and not just fears govern; where the truths written into our founding documents can steer the currents of history in the direction of justice. And we cannot do that without you.

Yankophobe: The problem with this speech is that it is some of same old Obama dumb. He himself remains a drone murderer and the killer of women, men and children in far flung corners of the world whilst allowing the standards of living to fall even further in the United States. 

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Graduates, you have taken this time to prepare on the quiet banks of the Hudson. You leave this place to carry forward a legacy that no other military in human history can claim. And you do so as part of a team that extends beyond your units or even our Armed Forces. In the course of your service, you will work as a team with diplomats and development experts. You will get to know allies and train partners. You will embody what it means for America to lead.

Next week, I will go to Normandy to honour the men who stormed the beaches. And while it is hard for many Americans to comprehend the courage and sense of duty that guided those who boarded small ships, it is familiar to you. At West Point, you define what it means to be a patriot.

Three years ago, Gavin White graduated from this Academy. He then served in Afghanistan. Like the soldiers who came before him, he was in a foreign land, helping people he’d never met, putting himself in harm’s way for the sake of his people back home. Gavin lost one of his legs in an attack. I met him last year at Walter Reed. He was wounded, but just as determined as the day that he arrived here. He developed a simple goal. Today, his sister Morgan will graduate. And true to his promise, Gavin will be there to stand and exchange salutes with her.

We have been through a long season of war. We have faced trials that were not foreseen, and divisions about how to move forward. But there is something in Gavin’s character, and America’s character, that will always triumph. Leaving here, you carry with you the respect of your fellow citizens. You will represent a nation with history and hope on our side. Your charge, now, is not only to protect our country, but to do what is right and just. As your commander-in-chief, I know you will. May God bless you. May God bless our men and women in uniform. And may God bless the United States of America.

 

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Yankophobe: God shall not bless the United States of America because it’s too evil. As to why it is so, nobody really knows, maybe it’s something to do with what Americans like to eat, to drink or even with the air that they get. Maybe it has something to do with the environment. Then again, maybe it has something to do with their history, you know, take something for nothing, grab and kill, starting a nation on somebody else’s land even before happily killing all its original inhabitants? Letting Satan in their collective hearts in return for freedom from their Imperial masters (and breaking the sanctity of oath in the process)? Then bringing millions of others from across the oceans to slave for them under different guises — a process which is still continuing? Who knows? But it’s a fact — God has given up on the United States of America, Satan took over long ago.

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Disgusting Habits and Horrible Crimes of American Presidents

December 31, 2008

Following are the findings of my leisurely multi-year research into the American presidents focusing on their unparalleled crimes against humanity, their oftentimes criminal behavior and their disgusting and sick personal habits and ways, and generally exploring the depths of their degeneracy.

America has had forty plus presidents in her very short but eventful history (which is still continuing).

Among them were some truly disgusting and repulsive individuals, by anyone’s standards.

The crimes of almost every American president and those of the benighted nation they led are truly of Biblical – and even Epic Planetary proportions – and their personal habits and ways are likewise disgusting and horrible beyond the imaginable, almost without exception.

And the malaise started right with the first one.

America’s first president, I think it was George Washington, was a committed slave owner, a driver of Negroes so to speak, until his very death. Such a die-hard slave owner was he that he refused to set his slaves free during his life and only granted them freedom (or what passed for it in America at the time) posthumously.

Thomas Jefferson, who also was a slave owner (as were most of the founding fathers), had an unhealthy predilection for young slave girls. He apparently had sexual intercourse with many who would now be classed as minors (thereby making him legally a pedophile), and in fact openly lived with one of them as man and wife after the death of his betrothed wife.

Many American presidents were prone to cussing and using foul language, such as Dwight Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. But cussing (when done in moderation) is not the most serious offense in anybody’s book.

What is probably the most disgusting one, however, is farting and belching in public. And America has had an unusually large number of such presidents. William Howard Taft, the 27th President, was notorious in this respect. Clinically obese and the fattest president ever, he suffered from flatulence (compulsive and random farting) and belching. Some even claimed he died of excessive farting.

Harry Truman belched and farted in front of people, it is said, much to the consternation of wife Bess. Somehow I don’t find it surprising that he is the one who ordered an inhumane and totally unnecessary nuclear attack on two cities in Japan. There is also evidence to suggest that he was in fact a British spy installed by the British agents in the U. S. government after they poisoned FDR with rat poison (as one theory has it) on Churchill’s orders for opposing the British empire too much.

John F. Kennedy raped Marylin Monroe, had many extra-marital affairs, groped the breasts of every young woman he came across and always got away with it (until his Dallas trip, that is).

Lyndon B. Johnson scratched his crotch and fingered his dick and balls at Cabinet meetings and in front of female White House staff members. He was also a chronic alcoholic and a sex fiend.

Ronald Reagan was a terrible blasphemer, and God may have punished him for that (Amen!) — Reagan seems to have labored in the fog of dementia for most of his two terms in office.

Bill Clinton is best known for his masturbation sessions in the White House’s Oval Office with or without a certain other party. But he also caused over 300,000 deaths by US bombing of Yugoslavia at various stages of its disintegration.

George W. Bush is a compulsive fartist too (all the same he is America’s best president ever in my view) and an unashamed one at that. It is said that, during his time in office, he liked to fart in the presence of junior members of the White House staff.

In light of the above I wonder what disgusting habits Obama has? Is he a belcher, a farter, a self-abuser or will he even bring with him to the White House something new, something altogether unheard of?

Update regarding President Obama. There as yet has been no reliable information on whether he likes to fart or belch in public or masturbate in the Oval Office like some of his predecessors did but he undeniably has the dubious distinction of being the world’s most prolific drone murderer.

It has also been suggested that, during his two terms in office, Obama, B. H. may have become the world’s most murderous black man surpassing his idol African dictator Idi Amin.

Obama, B.H. also appears to have adopted a gay penis doodle as his official signature, and he puts it on all U.S. state documents now.

obam dork

Donald Trump is 45th President and the first one with openly discussed improper sexual conduct even before acceding to office, including (self-confessed) sexual harassment, alleged rapes. Also known for tax evasion on a grand scale, corruption, cronyism, unscrupulous business dealings all over the world. Donal Trump was a cocaine user in the 1980s. Mental faculties suspect, mental health appears questionable.

Donald Trump committed human rights violations by executive order in January 2017 (banned refugees and nationals of certain countries from entering the US for no reason, other than their national origin and religious affiliation, suspended the US refugee program).

As of October 2017, Donald J. Trump has been continuing and even intensifying the United States’ mass murder by drone campaign started in earnest by his predecessor in power B. H. Obama, the 44th President. It is estimated that the civilian death toll of Trump’s drone campaign is up to 5,000 since acceding to office or 15 civilians illegally killed by drone every single day and that’s on top of all other deaths due to the US’ ongoing worldwide aggression.

Terrible Crimes (and Disgusting Habits) of All American Presidents by Crime (Habit)

Alcohol addiction, alcohol abuse, drunkenness: John Adams (excessive drinking), Martin Van Buren (drunkenness in office), John Tylor, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Chester A. Arthur, Grover Cleveland, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard Nixon.

Assassination: Dwight D. Eisenhower (ordered the CIA to kill Patrice Lumumba, Prime Minister of the Republic of Zaire), John F. Kennedy (successful CIA plot to kill Rafael Trujillo, President of the Dominican Republic in 1961; overthrow and murder of Abd al-Karim Qasim, Prime Minister of Iraq; CIA plot to assassinate Ngo Dinh Diem, President of the Republic of Vietnam), Lyndon B. Johnson (CIA sponsored plot to assassinate Dipa Nusantara Aidit, General Secretary of the Communist Party of Indonesia), Richard Nixon (CIA sponsored plots to assassinate Amilcar Cabral, General Secretary of the African Party of Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde Islands, in 1973; Salvador Allende, President of the Republic of Chile, in 1973; Pablo Neruda, Chilean poet, diplomat and politician, in 1973), Gerald Ford (political assassinations (CIA plots to assassinate Mujibur Rahman, President of Bangladesh, in 1975; Orlando Letelier, Chilean economist, politician and diplomat, in 1976), Jimmy Carter (CIA plots that killed Aldo Moro, Prime Minister of Italy, 1978; Ayatollah A. Madani, of Iran, in 1980; Oscar Romero, Archbishop of San Salvador, in 1980; Jaime Roldos Aguilera, President of Ecuador, in 1980; CIA complicity in the murder of Jean Donovan, American lay missionary, in El Salvador, in 1980; Dorothy Kazel, Maura Clarke, Ita Ford, American missionaries to El Salvador, in 1980), Ronald Reagan (CIA plots that killed Brigadier General Omar Torrijos, President of the Republic of Panama, in 1981; Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq, President of Pakistan, in 1988; CIA attempt on the life of Pope John Paul II, Leader of the Catholic Church)

Bloodthirstiness, blood lust, underlying necrophilia, mass murder: Abraham Lincoln (mass murder during the bloodiest war on American soil, the bloodiest civil war anywhere in the world, 600,000 dead which adjusted for today would mean about 60 million). Benjamin Harrison (mass murder – 300 Lakota Indians massacred at Wounded Knee). Grover Cleveland (mass murder – 34 killed while breaking the Chicago rail strike). William McKinley (necrophilia, blood lust, blood thirstiness, mass murder – US invasion of the Philippines 1899-1902 and subsequently over 650,000 Philippinos dead, Philippines Republic dissolved). Herbert Hoover (mass murder by capitalist economic policies – 12,000,000 dead in the US during the Great Depression (America alone)). Dwight D. Eisenhower (mass murder, necrophilia, blood lust, blood thirstiness – 10,000,000 dead in the Korean War). Harry S. Truman (unnecessary and inhuman nuclear attack on Japan resulting in mass murder). Lyndon B. Johnson (Vietnam war – over 3 million dead, mostly civilians; 1,200,000 dead as a result of a US sponsored and CIA guided anti-Communist coup in Indonesia; US Army suppression of black African Americans in Detroit in 1967 – 43 killed.). Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford (hundreds of thousands dead as a result of US-sponsored terror in Indonesia by Suharto; over 2 million killed in Cambodia in a decade of US bombing, starvation and political chaos.). Richard Nixon (5,000,000 dead as a result of a US intervention in the Congo, dictator Mabutu installed). Ronald Reagan (241 US marines killed by Shia bombing in Lebanon after Reagan ordered invasion). George H. W. Bush (Gulf war – many dead, including 500,000 dead due to US bombing of Iraq’s water supply, also about 1,000,000 dead due to subsequent US-led sanctions on Iraq; Panama invasion by US forces – over 2,000 Panamanians killed.); Bill Clinton (Balkan wars). Bill Clinton (wars of the West-provoked collapse of Yugoslavia, multiple US bombing campaigns, at least 300,000 dead). George W. Bush (2003 Iraq War, Afghanistan, over 2 million killed as a result of his policies). Barack H. Obama (over 500,000 killed as a result of policies, the world’s “most murderous black man”, “most prolific drone murderer”, the “most murderous Nobel peace prize winner ever”). Donald J. Trump (the United States’ mass murder by drone campaign, and the estimated civilian death toll of Trump’s drone campaign is up to 5,000 since acceding to office or 15 civilians illegally killed by drone every single day and that’s on top of all other deaths due to the US’ ongoing worldwide aggression).

Drug abuse, narcotic addiction: George Washington (grower and user of marijuana, opiates), Thomas Jefferson (opium, marijuana), Franklin Pierce (hashish), Ulysses S. Grant (cocaine), Woodrow Wilson (cocaine), Franklin D. Roosevelt (cocaine, painkillers, amphetamines), John F. Kennedy (LSD, marijuana, painkillers, codeine, Demerol, methadone, Ritalin, barbiturates, steroids), Richard Nixon (prescription drugs), Ronald Reagan (meds), Bill Clinton (marijuana, cocaine), George W. Bush (marijuana, cocaine), Barack H. Obama (marijuana, cocaine), Donald Trump (cocaine in the 1980s).

Farting and belching in public: William H. Taft (medical condition), Harry S. Truman (choice), George W. Bush (choice).

Human rights violations: John Adams (outlawed criticism of the U.S. Government), Abraham Lincoln (suspended the writ of Habeas Corpus), Woodrow Wilson (Palmer raids), Franklin D. Roosevelt (interred Asian-Americans for their national origin), Donald Trump (banned refugees and nationals of certain countries from entering the US for no reason, other than their national origin and religious affiliation, suspended the refugee program).

Insanity while in office: Ronald Reagan (dementia), Bill Clinton (compulsive masturbator), George W. Bush (low IQ), Barack H. Obama (abnormally high IQ, brain damage from pot smoking), Donald Trump.

Masturbation while in (Oval) office: Bill Clinton, George W. Bush.

Necrophilia manifesting itself in acts of mass (and often) unnecessary killings, mass murder: Abraham Lincoln (the bloodiest war on American soil, the bloodiest civil war anywhere in the world). Benjamin Harrison (mass murder – 300 Lakota Indians massacred at Wounded Knee). Grover Cleveland (mass murder – 34 killed while breaking the Chicago rail strike). William McKinley (necrophilia, blood lust, blood thirstiness, mass murder – US invasion of the Philippines 1899-1902 and subsequently over 650,000 Philippinos dead, Philippines Republic dissolved). Herbert Hoover (mass murder by capitalist economic policies – 12,000,000 dead in the US during the Great Depression (America alone)). Harry S. Truman (unnecessary and inhuman nuclear attack on Japan resulting in mass murder and great suffering). Dwight D. Eisenhower (mass murder, necrophilia, blood lust, blood thirstiness – 10,000,000 dead in the Korean War). Lyndon B. Johnson (Vietnam war – over 3 million dead, mostly civilians; 1,200,000 dead as a result of a US sponsored and CIA guided anti-Communist coup in Indonesia; US Army suppression of black African Americans in Detroit in 1967 – 43 killed.). Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford (hundreds of thousands dead as a result of US-sponsored terror in Indonesia by Suharto; over 2 million killed in Cambodia in a decade of US bombing, starvation and political chaos.). Richard Nixon (5,000,000 dead as a result of a US intervention in the Congo, Mabutu installed). Ronald Reagan (241 US marines killed by Shia bombing in Lebanon after Reagan ordered invasion). George H. W. Bush (Gulf war – many dead, including 500,000 dead due to US bombing of Iraq’s water supply, also 1,000,000 dead due to sanctions on Iraq; Panama invasion by US forces – over 2,000 Panamanians killed.). Bill Clinton (Balkan wars, multiple US bombing campaigns, at least 300,000 dead). George W. Bush (2003 Iraq War, Afghanistan, over 2 million killed as a result of his policies). Barack H. Obama (Afghanistan war 2008 to present, Iraq, Libya, Syria, etc. – over 500,000 killed as a result of policies, the world’s “most murderous black man”, “most prolific drone murderer”, the “most murderous Nobel peace prize winner ever”). Donald J. Trump (ordered cruise missile attacks on Syria under false pretenses, attacks civilians in Iraq, Yemen – hundreds dead in just one month of Donald Trump’s presidency). (2) Donald J. Trump (the United States’ mass murder by drone campaign, and the estimated civilian death toll of Trump’s drone campaign is up to 5,000 since acceding to office or 15 civilians illegally killed by drone every single day and that’s on top of all other deaths due to the US’ ongoing worldwide aggression).

Pedophilia in office and within wider White House administration: Thomas Jefferson (sexual interest in young slave girls), Benjamin Harrison (force-married own niece 25 years his junior), Ronald Reagan & George H. W. Bush and their numerous officials (1980s child homosexual prostitution sex scandal), Bill Clinton – a known associate of, and frequently traveled and allegedly engaged in acts of pedophilia together with, known Pedophile Jeffrey Epstein. Donald Trump – reportedly engaged in sex with underage girls in the 1980s.

Sex crimes, sex abuse in office & within White House administration: Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Harrison (incest, forced marriage), John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, Donald Trump (self-confessed sexual harassment, alleged rapes, pedophilia).

Slavery, slave ownership: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, Andrew Jackson.

WORST US PRESIDENT MASS MURDERERS:

Abraham Lincoln (mass murder during the bloodiest war on American soil, the bloodiest civil war anywhere in the world, 600,000 dead which adjusted for today would mean about 60 million). Benjamin Harrison (mass murder – 300 Lakota Indians massacred at Wounded Knee). William McKinley (necrophilia, blood lust, blood thirstiness, mass murder – US invasion of the Philippines 1899-1902 and subsequently over 650,000 Philippinos dead, Philippines Republic dissolved). Herbert Hoover (mass murder by capitalist economic policies – 12,000,000 dead in the US during the Great Depression (America alone)). Dwight D. Eisenhower (mass murder, necrophilia, blood lust, blood thirstiness – 10,000,000 dead in the Korean War). Harry S. Truman (unnecessary and inhuman nuclear attack on Japan resulting in mass murder). Lyndon B. Johnson (Vietnam war – over 3 million dead, mostly civilians; 1,200,000 dead as a result of a US sponsored and CIA guided anti-Communist coup in Indonesia; US Army suppression of black African Americans in Detroit in 1967 – 43 killed.). Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford (hundreds of thousands dead as a result of US-sponsored terror in Indonesia by Suharto; over 2 million killed in Cambodia in a decade of US bombing, starvation and political chaos.). Richard Nixon (5,000,000 dead as a result of a US intervention in the Congo, dictator Mabutu installed). Ronald Reagan (241 US marines killed by Shia bombing in Lebanon after Reagan ordered invasion). George H. W. Bush (Gulf war – many dead, including 500,000 dead due to US bombing of Iraq’s water supply, also about 1,000,000 dead due to subsequent US-led sanctions on Iraq; Panama invasion by US forces – over 2,000 Panamanians killed.). Bill Clinton (Balkan wars). Bill Clinton (wars of the West-provoked collapse of Yugoslavia, multiple US bombing campaigns, at least 300,000 dead). George W. Bush (2003 Iraq War, Afghanistan, over 2 million killed as a result of his policies). Barack H. Obama (over 500,000 killed as a result of policies, the world’s “most murderous black man”, “most prolific drone murderer”, the “most murderous Nobel peace prize winner ever”). Donald J. Trump (the United States’ mass murder by drone campaign, and the estimated civilian death toll of Trump’s drone campaign is up to 5,000 since acceding to office or 15 civilians illegally killed by drone every single day and that’s on top of all other deaths due to the US’ ongoing worldwide aggression).

***

Terrible Crimes and Disgusting Habits of All American Presidents by President

1. George Washington (1789-1797): slave ownership, breaking sanctity of oath, revolutionary terrorism, narcotic addiction (grew and used marijuana), blood lust, underlying necrophilia.

2. John Adams (1797-1801), stealing Native American lands, outlawed criticism of the U.S government, alcohol addiction, blood lust, underlying necrophilia.

3. Thomas Jefferson (1801-1809): pedophilia, slave ownership, stealing Native American lands, narcotic addiction (marijuana, opium), blood lust, underlying necrophilia.

4. James Madison (1809-1817), stealing Native American lands

5. James Monroe (1817-1825), slave owner, kept massive plantations, dealt in slaves

6. John Quincy Adams (1825-1829),

7. Andrew Jackson (1829-1837), slave owner.

8. Martin Van Buren (1837-1841): alcohol abuse,

9. William Henry Harrison (1841)

10. John Tyler (1841-1845), alcohol abuse

11. James K. Polk (1845-1849)

12. Zachary Taylor (1849-1850)

13. Millard Fillmore (1850-1853)

14. Franklin Pierce (1853-1857), alcohol abuse, narcotic addiction (hashish)

15. James Buchanan (1857-1861), alcohol abuse

16. Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865): blood lust (started a bloody civil war), human rights violations (scrapped Habeas Corpus), underlying necrophilia.

17. Andrew Johnson (1865-1869)

18. Ulysses S. Grant (1869-1877): alcohol abuse, drunkenness, narcotic addiction (cocaine)

19. Rutherford B. Hayes (1877-1881)

20. James A. Garfield (1881)

21. Chester Arthur (1881-1885), alcohol abuse

22. Grover Cleveland (1885-1889), alcohol abuse

23. Benjamin Harrison (1889-1893), incestual relationship – force-married his own niece 25 years his junior; mass murder – 300 Lakota Indians massacred at Wounded Knee.

24. Grover Cleveland (1893-1897), mass murder – 34 killed while breaking the Chicago rail strike.

25. William McKinley (1897-1901): necrophilia, blood lust, blood thirstiness (US invasion of the Philippines 1899-1902 and subsequently over 650,000 Philippinos dead, Philippines Republic dissolved.

26. Theodore Roosevelt (1901-1909): thievery on a grand scale (stole Panama from Columbia), mistreatment of animals (a prolific and brutal hunter)

27. William Howard Taft (1909-1913): uncontrollable farting and belching in public

28. Woodrow Wilson (1913-1921): narcotic addition, human rights violations (Palmer raids).

29. Warren G. Harding (1921-1923)

30. Calvin Coolidge (1923-1929)

31. Herbert Hoover (1929-1933), mass murder by capitalist economic policies – 12,000,000 dead in the US during the Great Depression (America alone).

32. Franklin D. Roosevelt (1933-1945): narcotic addiction: cocaine, painkillers, stimulants; human rights violations (interred Asian-American citizens for no reason, other than their national origin).

33. Harry S Truman (1945-1953): farting and belching in public as a matter of choice (not a medical condition), blood lust, underlying necrophilia manifesting itself in acts of mass killing using nuclear arms for the first time in history.

34. Dwight D. Eisenhower (1953-1961): political assassination (ordered the CIA to kill Patrice Lumumba, Prime Minister of the Republic of Zaire), mass murder, necrophilia, blood lust, blood thirstiness – 10,000,000 dead in theKorean War.

35. John F. Kennedy (1961-1963): womanizing, improper sexual conduct, rape of Marilyn Monroe, narcotic addiction (LSD, marijuana, painkillers, codeine, demerol, methadone, ritalin, barbituates, steroids), also engineered the 1963 Arif coup in Iraq (which eventually resulted in Saddam Hussein coming to power); political assassination (successful CIA plot to kill Rafael Trujillo, President of the Dominican Republic in 1961; assassination of Ngo Dinh Diem, President of the Republic of Vietnam).

36. Lyndon B. Johnson (1963-1969): improper behavior (scratching crotch in front of female White House staff), blood lust, many killed during Vietnam war. Alcohol abuse, sex crimes. Political assassination (CIA sponsored plot to assassinate Dipa Nusantara Aidit, General Secretary of the Communist Party of Indonesia); 1,200,000 dead as a result of a US sponsored and CIA guided anti-Communist coup in Indonesia; US Army suppression of black African Americans in Detroit in 1967 – 43 killed.

37. Richard Nixon (1969-1974), alcohol abuse, substance abuse (prescription drugs abuse), blood lust – many killed during Vietnam war. Political assassinations (CIA sponsored plots to assassinate Amilcar Cabral, General Secretary of the African Party of Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde Islands, in 1973; Salvador Allende, President of the Republic of Chile, in 1973; Pablo Neruda, Chilean poet, diplomat and politician, in 1973); hundreds of thousands dead as a result of US-sponsored terror in Indonesia by Suharto; 5,000,000 dead as a result of a US intervention in the Congo, Mabutu installed; over 2 million killed in Cambodia in a decade of US bombing, starvation and political chaos.

38. Gerald Ford (1974-1977), political assassinations (CIA plots to assassinate Mujibur Rahman, President of Bangladesh, in 1975; Orlando Letelier, Chilean economist, politician and diplomat, in 1976); hundreds of thousands dead as a result of US-sponsored terror in Indonesia by Suharto.

39. Jimmy Carter (1977-1981): religious insanity, also ironically became the Godfather of Osama Bin Laden. Political assassinations (CIA plots that killed Aldo Moro, Prime Minister of Italy, 1978; Ayatollah A. Madani, of Iran, in 1980; Oscar Romero, Archbishop of San Salvador, in 1980; Jaime Roldos Aguilera, President of Ecuador, in 1980; CIA complicity in the murder of Jean Donovan, American lay missionary, in El Salvador, in 1980; Dorothy Kazel, Maura Clarke, Ita Ford, American missionaries to El Salvador, in 1980).

40. Ronald Reagan (1981-1989): insane while in office – advanced dementia; sex crimes, child sex – a 198os child homosexual prostitution sex scandal involving Reagan VIPs. Political assassinations (CIA plots that killed Brigadier General Omar Torrijos, President of the Republic of Panama, in 1981; Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq, President of Pakistan, in 1988; CIA attempt on the life of Pope John Paul II, Leader of the Catholic Church); 241 US marines killed by Shia bombing in Lebanon after Reagan ordered invasion.

41. George H. W. Bush (1989-1993): sex crimes, child sex – a 1980s child homosexual prostitution sex scandal involving Bush VIPs, blood lust, Gulf war – many dead, including 500,000 dead due to US bombing of Iraq’s water supply, also about 1,000,000 dead due to subsequent US-led sanctions on Iraq; Panama invasion by US forces – over 2,000 Panamanians killed.

42. Bill Clinton (1993-2001): masturbation in office, improper sexual conduct, drug abuse – marijuana, cocaine, blood lust – started bloody Balkans war – many dead. Pedophilia – frequently traveled and allegedly engaged in acts of pedophilia together with known Pedophile Jeffrey Epstein. Allegations of multiple rapes, including pedo rapes.

43. George W. Bush (2001-2009): farting and belching in public as a matter of choice (not a medical condition), clinically low IQ – possibly retarded, bloodthirstiness – over 2 million killed as a result of policies; narcotic addiction (marijuana, cocaine), improper sexual behavior in the Oval Office, also apparently masturbated a male horse at least once. Political assassination (CIA murder of Rafic Hariri, Prime Minister of Lebanon, in 2005).

44. Barack Obama (2009-2016): drug abuse (marijuana, possibly cocaine), mental faculties, speech affected; bloodthirstiness or blood lust and possibly underlying necrophilia – over 300,000 killed as a result of policies, the “most murderous black man in history”, the “most prolific drone killer”, the “most murderous Nobel peace prize winner ever”. Mental health issues.

Barack Obama also appears to have adopted a gay penis doodle as his official signature, and he puts it all U.S. state documents now.

obam dork

45. Donald Trump (2016-?): improper sexual conduct, including (self-confessed) sexual harassment, alleged rapes, pedophilia. Economic crimes: tax evasion on a grand scale, corruption, cronyism. Mental faculties suspect, mental health questionable. Drug abuse: a cocaine addict in the 1980s.

Donald J. Trump – Whether true or not, information came to light via a British dossier on Trump, including allegations of Trump’s sexual perversions, corruption, links to Russian intelligence and cooperation with Russian entities and interests.

Donald J. Trump – Human rights violations (in January 2017 banned refugees and nationals of certain countries from entering the US for no reason, other than their national origin and religious affiliation, suspended the US refugee program).

Donald J. Trump – mass murder, aggression against the world, possible underlying necrophilia or blood lust, blood thirstiness – the United States’ mass murder by drone campaign, and the estimated civilian death toll of Trump’s drone campaign is up to 5,000 since acceding to office or 15 civilians illegally killed by drone every single day and that’s on top of all other deaths due to the US’ ongoing worldwide aggression.

Powell Backs Obama — One More Reason Not to Vote

October 19, 2008

Powell has announced that he supports Obama for U.S. president. Obama says he is honored. But what does it say about the real issues behind this election?

Powell, first. Just who is Powell? Yeah he is best known for being that madman who went before the U.N. Security Council and lied about Iraq’s (non-existent) weapons of mass destruction, making a real show of himself — at one point waiving a test tube in the air like a dangerous lunatic. He also thinks maybe he has a voice, a stage presence because he’s been known to engage in disgusting exhibitionist acts singing Village People hits, attempting A-capella performances with his counterparts and cronies from the governments of America’s puppets, all as ugly and as untalented as himself, and — more recently — appearing on stage with a hip-hop (or something) group. The look of him, his ugly face, gyrating his fat pelvis to the sound of the music… horrible.

Colin “Test Tube” Powell

But why does he support Obama now? He is a Republican whereas Obama is a Democrat. He has no business endorsing Democrats. Would he have endorsed say Hillary Clinton? No. Would he have endorsed any other Democrat? No. He wouldn’t have endorsed them because none of them are black except Obama. So the real reason he endorses Obama is because he is black and Obama is black. It’s black on black endorsement. What Powell with his endorsement of Obama has just proved is that this election is about racial issues. And I guess it should be a good reason not to vote for Obama (whichever your race is) and since the other candidate also kinda sucks, it is a good reason not to vote at all or at the very least vote independent, come Nov. 4., none of which concerns me, truth to tell, my interest being purely academic.

Was McCain Recruited by the KGB?

September 19, 2008

A Russian newspaper claims that McCain was recruited by the KGB when he was a POW in Vietnam.

According to the report, Soviet military advisers were in the prison where McCain was held. As soon as his identity was established, he was moved to a solitary cell. Soviet advisers spent much time talking to him. Later he was brought to the prison director’s office where he reportedly signed some papers. After that he was taken to a hospital where Soviet medics worked, and the prison director never saw him again.

A former KGB official reportedly recognized him as Agent Jack Mouse, a.k.a. Mickey Mouse. He allegedly says that McCain was a trainee in a KGB espionage school until 1972.

Who’s this?

Updated on Sept 23: more on McCain & the KGB.

“As an example, the Senate Select Committee has never followed up on the explosive testimony of former KGB Maj. Gen. Oleg Kalugin, who testified, under oath, that the KGB interrogated U.S. POWs in Vietnam.

Kalugin stated that one of the POWs worked on by the KGB was a “high-ranking naval officer,” who, according to Kalugin, agreed to work with the Soviets upon his repatriation to the United States and has frequently appeared on U.S. television.

Whether this is true or not it certainly begs to be investigated and, like it or not, Sen. John McCain fits the description, and his behavior, also like it or not, raises serious questions” . By Ted Sampley

However, this blogger wishes to state categorically that even if (and that’s a big IF) a minuscule part of these claims and allegations or conjectures is true it does not disqualify the above-named person from the high office of President. In fact, it probably shows that he is well qualified to be president and is ready to lead and to take difficult but necessary decisions in our troubled times. I certainly prefer him to Barrack Obama, although I have to admit that there seems to be very little difference of substance between the two but that will be the subject of one of my next posts.

McCain Keeps Begging for Money

September 17, 2008

McCain election HQ continues to beg for “your valuable donations”.

This blogger does hereby endorse the candidacies of McCain & Palin.

Give him your money.

Bush Likes to Fart

September 16, 2008

Bush likes to fart, likes it when others are farting around him but there’s nothing he likes more than to let rip in public, preferably during an official function at the White House or elsewhere.

His farts are so noxious (follow the link above to read more) that it takes only one to clear the Oval Office.

Still, Dubya is my favorite American president and he is by no means the worst American president (as some have suggested (with a few notable exceptions)), and something tells me he is a much better president than his successor is going to be.


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